1. Among moderate Republicans, the numbers look a lot like those for Democrats: 52 percent said they thought the Common Core would improve educational quality against just 7 percent who expected a decline. ‘Strong’ Republicans had mixed views; 29 percent said the Common Core would improve educational quality against 22 percent who said it would produce a decline.

    — "Jeb Bush’s Stance on Education May Not Be That Controversial"

    (Source: fivethirtyeight.com)

  2. The partisan split is not terribly strong on the Common Core. Among Republicans, 44 percent said they thought the Common Core would improve the quality of education, against 13 percent who said it would make things worse. (Another 44 percent either said they thought it would have no effect or had no opinion.) The numbers among independents and voters unaffiliated with a political party were nearly identical to the Republican figures.

    The partisan split is not terribly strong on the Common Core. Among Republicans, 44 percent said they thought the Common Core would improve the quality of education, against 13 percent who said it would make things worse. (Another 44 percent either said they thought it would have no effect or had no opinion.) The numbers among independents and voters unaffiliated with a political party were nearly identical to the Republican figures.

  3. The chart below … provides the partisan split on a pathway to citizenship (both with and without requirements) and on abortion, education, global warming, gun control, health care, inequality, the minimum wage, same-sex marriage and U.S. policy toward Israel, as based on recent polls.

    The chart below … provides the partisan split on a pathway to citizenship (both with and without requirements) and on abortion, education, global warming, gun control, health care, inequality, the minimum wage, same-sex marriage and U.S. policy toward Israel, as based on recent polls.

  4. The steep decline in the share of Americans working or looking for work has been one of the most worrisome trends in the slow recovery. Some 40,000 people re-entered the labor force to look for jobs, and the number of ‘discouraged workers’ (people who have stopped looking for jobs because they don’t think they can find them) is down 13 percent over the past year. Both numbers are hints that the job market may be gaining enough strength to draw back in some workers who had given up.

    — "Jobs Report: Back to Where We Started"

    (Source: fivethirtyeight.com)

  5. The wounds of the recession are far from fully healed. Total payrolls remain more than 400,000 below their prior peak due to deep cuts in the number of government workers, especially at the state and local level. And the adult population (16 years and older) has grown by 14 million since the recession began, meaning the U.S. job market is nowhere close to fully recovered on a per-capita basis.

    — "Jobs Report: Back to Where We Started"

    (Source: fivethirtyeight.com)

  6. After more than six years, the U.S. private sector has at last regained the jobs lost in the Great Recession. … The private sector lost 8.8 million jobs in the recession and has gained 8.9 million since.

    — "Jobs Report: Back to Where We Started"

    (Source: fivethirtyeight.com)

  7. “Medical-Marijuana Debate on Front Burner in Albany”

    Medical-Marijuana Debate on Front Burner in Albany

  8. The even bigger implications may be for the next jobs crisis, whenever it hits. If the situation facing the long-term unemployed is essentially hopeless — a harsh but not unreasonable reading of the evidence — then that makes it all the more important to avoid allowing people to fall into long-term unemployment in the first place.

    — "Out of Work, Out of Luck"

    (Source: fivethirtyeight.com)

  9. The nearly 5-year-old economic recovery has so far been too weak to put many of the recession’s victims back to work. And there is mounting evidence that even if the economy accelerated now, it would be too late: Many if not most of the 3.8 million Americans who have been out of work for more than six months will never again hold steady jobs.

    — "Out of Work, Out of Luck"

    (Source: fivethirtyeight.com)

  10. Arizona’s term limits also create an environment friendly to extreme candidates. In their paper on clean election laws, Masket and Miller demonstrated that politicians’ ideological extremism tends to fade after a few terms. But in Arizona, where the term limits for state legislators are eight years, this change doesn’t come. They aren’t in office long enough.

    — "The Wild, Conservative West"

    (Source: fivethirtyeight.com)